Jojo Moyes’s The Giver of Stars

The Giver of Stars

Alice seems to have jumped from the proverbial frying pan into the fire. In her native England during the Great Depression, she is bored and unhappy, and when she meets a handsome American man named Bennett, she quickly marries him to escape. When they relocate to his home state of Kentucky, she expects a well-to-do urban life, centered perhaps in Lexington. Instead, she finds herself in remote Eastern Kentucky, in impoverished coal country, trapped in an unhappy marriage. When the local pack horse library needs volunteers, Alice signs up, mainly as an excuse to get out of her house and away from her husband and father-in-law. At first, Alice is horrified by the rough people she encounters on her route, but she soon falls in love with her work, the people, and the mountains. Still, the solace she finds in work does nothing to ease her troubles at home. Complications ensue. . . .

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Book Buzz: 19th Century Maine, Christmas Miracles, and the Joys of Being Crafty

Every month, we’re profiling new-ish releases that are getting critical and commercial buzz. For December, we’re looking at a re-released historical novel about the lives of 3 women in Maine in the 1800s, the latest book in a popular holiday series, and a celebration of folks who work with their hands.

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Movie Review: The Old Man and The Gun (2018)

The Old Man and The Gun

Forrest Tucker is a polite, dapper, and immensely charming 70-year-old man, with old-fashioned manners. He is, as one person who met him briefly explains, “Well, he was also sort of a gentleman.”

He also compulsively robs banks.

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Old Favorites: E-Books and Audiobooks

ebook

Usually on the third Tuesday of every month, I write an Old Favorites post, celebrating favorite classic authors of mine. In the course of researching what to write for November, I learned that today marks the 12th anniversary of the release of the first Kindle. How time flies!

As e-books have become more popular, many commentators have speculated they will be the cause of the demise of public libraries. However, as I noted last year in a rebuttal to one of these commentators, libraries have been adapting to and embracing new technology for their entire history, and e-books are no exception. . . .

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Louise Penny’s The Hangman (2010)

The Hangman

Carol Ann recommended Louise Penny’s Quebec-set Armand Gamache detective series a few months ago. We like a lot of the same authors and books, so I immediately was intrigued. Since then, I’ve noticed we circulate a lot of Louise Penny books, and I’ve had even more folks gush about how much they love the books. I only got around to trying a Gamache book recently, and I am so glad I did! (As always, thanks for the great recommendation, Carol Ann! 🙂 )

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Book Buzz: Digital Romances, Post-WWII Thrillers, and Treasure Hunts

Every month, we’re profiling new-ish releases that are getting critical and commercial buzz. For November, we’re looking at a witty rom com revolving around social media, the intense hunt for a fictional Nazi war criminal in the years following WWII, and a fascinating actual treasure hunt that has spanned over 200 years.

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TV Review: Chernobyl (2019)

Chernobyl

Halloween is just a couple of days away, so it’s that time of year where all our horror movies have a healthy circulation. Still, the most horrifying thing I’ve watched recently wasn’t a slasher movie. Instead, it was a matter-of-fact HBO miniseries about the infamous 1986 Soviet nuclear accident at Chernobyl. . . .

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