Silence (2016)

Silence

A long weekend is coming up for most of us! What better way to spend part of it than indulging in a little big screen time from the comfort of your couch? Here’s one film I would say is a must-see that you might have missed. . . .

In the midst of intense persecution of Japanese Christians in the 17th century, Portuguese Jesuits Rodrigues (Andrew Garfield) and Garupe (Adam Driver) insist on traveling to the country to find their mentor Father Ferreira (Liam Neeson). Reports have surfaced that he has apostatized, and they refuse to believe it. Despite the danger, they enter the country and quickly find themselves in a world of concealed faith, persecution, and difficult moral dilemmas.

I was intrigued by this movie when it was first announced for several reasons. One is that it was a Martin Scorsese film, and as I mentioned earlier this year, I enjoy his work. I was also intrigued that this movie seemed different from many of his recent efforts. Beyond the specific historical time period–not commonly covered in popular culture–it also didn’t feature many of the actors who frequently pop up in his movies. Some of the themes in the movie–guilt, sin, salvation–are recurring in his work, but still, it seemed like a change from business as usual, and I was intrigued.

And I’m happy to say I wasn’t disappointed! Though the basic premise sounds like a rescue mission, that’s really not what ensues. It’s hard to explain the rest of the movie without providing spoilers, but I appreciated how ultimately complex it was. The movie isn’t very interested in demonizing one side or the other and is instead more focused on probing different characters’ responses to their situation.

I appreciated that, and I thought the actors did a great job of conveying that. In fact, one of the best performances in the film for me was that of Yōsuke Kubozuka as Kichijiro, the priests’ nervous, potentially shady guide. His character was one that could easily have fallen into well-worn tropes, but the movie avoided that and was all the better for it.

The movie has an offbeat sense of pace, too. It isn’t action-packed, but it also isn’t boring. It’s a long movie–over 2.5 hours–but I found it absorbing throughout. As a given in any film about persecution, there was violence, and it was disturbing, but it wasn’t as graphic as I was expecting. That in no way made it less disturbing, but I did find that surprising, especially given how spectacularly violent so many of Scorsese’s other movies are.

In a way, this movie probably felt the least like a Scorsese film of all the ones I have seen, but I don’t think that’s a problem. There are some really interesting camera angles at times and a dark sense of humor pervading several scenes and some other touches that I think of as being quintessentially Scorsese. The book is based on a novel by Shūsaku Endō, which I would like to read and haven’t had time for, and I suspect the fact that it is an adaptation is one reason for its differences with the rest of his work.

The film is not without its flaws, though I found them pretty minimal. I thought the cast did a great job, but I did find some of their attempts at Portuguese accents uneven. Their efforts ranged from “generically foreign” to “Irish and not even trying,” but I didn’t find it as distracting as I usually do, which I consider a testament to the overall quality of the movie. I also thought that there was a touch too much narration, usually one of my favorite parts of a Scorsese movie, but I assume that was excerpts straight from the book.

Overall, I thought this was an excellent movie. If you like historical drama or thought-provoking drama, this one is well worth watching. As always, follow this link to our online library catalog to place a hold or learn more about the movie.

Recommended if you enjoyed The Mission.

Have you watched this movie? Have you read the book? How do you feel about movie accents? Tell us in the comments!

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From Page to Screen: The Lost City of Z

 

It’s one of the great mysteries of 20th century exploration: what happened to Percy Fawcett?

The British military officer, surveyer, and explorer was one of the key figures in mapping and exploring the Amazon. He had become obsessed with the belief that, contrary to what other experts claimed, a large, sophisticated civilization had once existed in the dense jungle. He named that mysterious place “Z,” and he very badly wanted to find it.

In his late 50s, the undaunted Fawcett, his eldest son, and his son’s best friend plunged into Amazonia in 1925, determined to prove the world wrong. They were never seen again.

Much as how centuries before Fawcett conquistadors disappeared looking for the city of El Dorado, dozens of adventurers have also disappeared trying to locate Fawcett and/or “Z.”

After reading and enjoying David Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon earlier this month, I decided to give his first book about Fawcett and his disappearance, which was recently adapted into a film, a try.

Beware, there be some mild spoilers ahead.

Continue reading “From Page to Screen: The Lost City of Z”

David Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon

Killers of the Flower Moon

In the 1920s, the Osage tribe of Oklahoma were the wealthiest people per capita in the world after oil was found on their land in the early 1900s. That statistic belies the reality of the situation, though, in which many of the Osage who owned valuable headrights had to have a white guardian to control their money and financial affairs. Nonetheless, much was made of the wealth that was on the reservation.

And in 1921, wealthy tribe members started disappearing and turning up dead. Still others succumbed to suspicious instances of alcoholic poisoning and a mysterious “wasting disease.” People who began investigating the deaths also started disappearing and dying. Within a few years, over two dozen people had died under suspicious circumstances. Eventually, the FBI under a newly appointed director named J. Edgar Hoover were brought in to investigate.

As someone who is interested in the 1920s, true crime, and Native American history, I was really surprised that I had never heard of the Osage “Reign of Terror” when this book was released earlier this year.

Continue reading “David Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon”

Oddly-Specific Genres: As Seen On TV

The dog days of summer are here! For many of us, this means it’s time to stay inside and binge watch some TV. But did you know some of the best of those great TV shows you love are actually adaptations of books?  It’s true!

Everything from epic fantasies (Game of Thrones) to historical romances with a science fiction twist (Outlander) to dystopian social commentary (The Handmaid’s Tale) to modern Western mysteries (Longmire) to supernatural comic books (Preacher and American Gods) are adapted for television now.

And if you think the adaptation craze on television is going to be ending anytime soon, well, think again.

Below are some books to start reading now, so when the television adaptations they are based on hit DVDs or the screen soon, you’ll be ready.

Special thanks to Mary-Esther for giving me some excellent suggestions for shows highlighted in this post!

As always, follow this link to our online library catalog to learn more about these items.

Continue reading “Oddly-Specific Genres: As Seen On TV”